Statistics is music to our ears

Two Smartly content authors join forces to give you this sweeping ode to statistical correlation: The Correlation Song.

Here at Smartly, we’ve purposefully built a team of polymaths: our business knowledge and experience extend from corporate governance to market research to advanced statistics and beyond. Our educational backgrounds are equally broad: we’ve got a Ph.D. linguist and a Ph.D. mathematician cum classicist, a philosopher, a handful of historians, a quartet of computer science wizards—the list goes on. We even have a Ph.D. archeologist (Indiana Jones, anyone?).

So I guess it’s no surprise that our team’s other skills and interests also run the gamut: from marketing associate Karina’s expertise in fashion to co-founder Alexie’s mastery of Italian to content creator Ray’s homemade doll houses.

For Ellie and I (both members of the content team), our other skill is music: Ellie as a shredding bassist and gifted singer on the San Fran scene, and I as a Latin Grammy-nominated recording engineer and composer (hi, Mom!) based in LA.

Last week, we joined forces to give you this, The Correlation Song. Ellie, our top statistics author/editor, was so inspired by her love of stats that she wrote and sang this sweeping ode to correlation. I am honored to have simply helped bring the track to life. We hope you enjoy these warm—and educational!—vibes from the West Coast. And don’t hesitate to share this song with others: being social and being successful are strongly correlated.

P.S.—Make sure to check out our course Two-Variable Statistics, the inspiration for this dope cut.

Nostalgia for Overhead Projectors

Bret Victor gave an entertaining talk on the history and/or future of computing at DBX 2013. In addition to the fascinating subject matter, Bret took the charming step of presenting with transparencies and an overhead projector.

overhead projector

Bret Victor gave an entertaining talk on the history and/or future of computing at DBX 2013. In addition to the fascinating subject matter, Bret took the charming step of presenting with transparencies and an overhead projector.

We thought it’d be fun to recreate this effect. An evening of hacking resulted in a new toy: TransparenCSS (demo | source).

We’re abusing -webkit-mask-box-image, so for the full experience you’ll need Safari or Chrome. Firefox works, but you’ll be missing out on the “virtual glaucoma” effect.

Feel free to use TransparenCSS as a base for your own retro-future conference talks.

Questions, comments? You should follow Pedago on Twitter.

Learn more about online education at Pedago on Pedago.com.

†Technically, an overhead projector fitted with a camera in the armature. Presumably, it would have taken a fairly strong bulb to project an image large enough for the entire conference hall…