Companies & Universities

Corporate Training Programs: What Are They Really Worth?

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Companies in the US spend over $160Bn a year training their employees, but, are they really getting their money’s worth? Probably not!

More often than not, corporate training involves disengaged minds. Throughout a typical absurdly long training video, employees often text, read the news or catch up on work, but rarely give the training their full undivided attention. You probably know it by now… your required compliance training material is profoundly boring and really doesn’t influence the workplace environment or improve employee productivity. As a learning or training manager you are looking to justify the thousands of dollars assigned to your attempts to educate your employees.

What about those skills that you actually want to see in action? How do you keep your employees from hampering their coworker’s productivity with questions they should know the answer to? Or avoid having your managers improvise trainings unsuccessfully? In order to increase your employees’ productivity and intellectual growth, you should encourage ongoing learning. It’s your duty to enable this through the right methods and channels. Here are a couple tips that will make education in the workplace more effective:

  1. Make ongoing learning part of your company culture. As an employee, it’s hard to keep up with work, exercise, family, and on top of that, education and skills development. When you make learning a priority for the company, employees will make it a priority too.
  2. Articulate to your employees that training is for their own personal development, not for the company. These are skills that will be with them going forward in your company or at any other.
  3. Allow them to learn on their own terms, be flexible about their time, schedules and preferences. Some people would rather learn on their commute to work, or in bed right before going to sleep. Let employees fit training into their schedules by setting expectations and deadlines, but not mandating how and when training should be consumed.
  4. Reward success. Track your employee’s performance and acknowledge their achievements.
  5. Make it quick, short and sweet. Employees can’t handle hours-long lectures or videos, especially when they can’t stop thinking about their to-do list.

Sounds easy, right? Wrong… 46% of training hours were delivered by an instructor in a brick-and-mortar classroom setting, and 90% of new skills are lost within the year. Maybe it’s time to start investing some of that $160Bn in better learning solutions. And yes, a lot of training is being done online nowadays, particularly compliance, but does online actually mean effective? Not necessarily, sitting back and watching a video online might as well be the same as sitting in a classroom and watching a lecture passively. The effectivity of learning both on and offline comes from the interaction with the material and concepts. So, if you want a combination of flexibility and effective learning, try an online, interactive tool!

1,2 Training Magazine, 2015 Training Industry Report. 2 Wall Street Journal, “So much training, so little show for it.”

 

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